Observation of a stellar occultation by the Polymele asteroid from Senegal

IRD – CNRS Presse release/ October, 2, 2020 (translated from French version by David Baratoux)

During the night of September 23-24, 2020, an international scientific cooperation, mobilizing Senegalese (ASPA), Belgian (Univ. Antwerp) and French researchers – from IRD, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, Université Côte d’Azur and Université Paris-Saclay – made it possible to observe for the first time a star occultation by (15094) Polymèle, a Trojan asteroid of Jupiter. This observation campaign, which is part of the preparations for NASA’s Lucy space mission, marks a new milestone for West African astronomy.

Coordinated by NASA, the Lucy space mission will begin in October 2021 for 12 years. Its objective: to fly over an asteroid in the main belt and six Trojan asteroids of Jupiter, in order to improve knowledge on the origin of the planets and the formation of the solar system. A preparatory step for the flyby is for astronomers to determine the size and shape of the asteroids. This measurement is carried out when they pass in front of a star, a phenomenon called stellar occultation.

On the night of September 23rd to 24th, researchers managed to observe a stellar occultation by (15094) Polymer, the smallest of the six asteroids, which will be flown by the Lucy mission in 2027. Sponsored by NASA and entrusted to the Senegalese Association for the Promotion of Astronomy (ASPA) by Marc Buie (Southwest Research Institute), this observation mobilized about forty researchers, with the support of IRD and CNRS. Fourteen telescopes were deployed at different observation sites in the Fatick and Kaolack region of Senegal.

The intensive training of the researchers in the use of the 20 cm diameter mobile telescopes and acquisition systems, sent by NASA to Senegal, took place the three nights before the occultation at Fatick. Despite the development of a large storm cell over the Kaolack region on the night of the observation, the strategy of deploying the telescopes proved effective in observing the stellar occultation. The collected data will allow to obtain a first estimate of the size of the Polymer asteroid, while the shape of the object will be specified by the next observation campaigns.

Developing research in astronomy in Senegal

This successful observation campaign, carried out by a very large majority of Senegalese astronomers, marks an important step in the development of astronomical research in Senegal. These actions illustrate a coordinated effort to promote astronomical and space sciences in Africa, led since 2017 by an international consortium of researchers: the African Initiative for Planetology and Space Sciences.

During an observation campaign in 2018, 50 American, 7 French and 21 Senegalese researchers had already succeeded in observing the last occultation of the asteroid Arrokoth, before its overflight in January 2019 by the New Horizons probe[1].

Press contacts

  • IRD press contact : Cristelle Duos / presse@ird.fr / +33 (0)4 91 99 94 87

The “Polymele stellar occultation team”

M. Abdoulaye BA, Sciences des Matériaux GPSSM, Senegal
M. Thierno Ousmane BA, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Senegal.
M. Mahamadou BALDE, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Senegal.
M. David BARATOUX, Coordinator European team, Planetary Scientists and Geologist, Senior Scientist at the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development, laboratoiry Géosciences environnement Toulouse of Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, david.baratoux@ird.fr, France.
M. Sylvain BOULEY, Professor of Planetary Science, Université Paris-Saclay, Géosciences Paris Saclay – GEOPS, sylvain.bouley@universite-paris-saclay.fr, France.
M. Marc BUIE, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Co-Investigator Lucy Mission, Coordination of Occultation Observation Camapaigns, U.S.A.
M. Mor CISSE, GEOMATICA, Senegal.
François COLAS, Astronomer CNRS à l’Observatoire de Paris – PSL (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides), francois.colas@observatoiredeparis.psl.eu, France.
M. Dembo DIAKHITE, Ministère de l’Enseignement Supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Senegal.
M. Dembo DIENG, Ecole Supérieure Polytechnique, LPAO-SF, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Baidy Demba DIOP, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Ministère de l’Education Nationale, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Thierno DIOP, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Ingénieur Civil, Senegal.
M. Omar DIOUF, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Sénégal.
M. Diogoye DIOUF, Université de Thiès, UFR des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, DPT Génie Civil, Senegal.
M. Gilbert Séraphin DOREGO, ISRA, Geomatics, Remote Sensing, Senegal.
M. Makhoudia FALL, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Geologist, Senegal.
M. Mactar FAYE, Université Alioune DIOP de Bambey (UADB), Bambey, Senegal.
M. Maram KAÏRE, Coordinator of the mission in Senegal, Astronomer, Président of Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, maramkaire@gmail.com, Senegal.
M. Alarba KANDE, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Inspecteur PC, Senegal.
Mme Katrien KOLENBERG, Antwerp University, Belgium.
M. Eric LAGADEC, Assistant Astronomer at Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, Laboratoire J.L. Lagrange, eric.lagadec@oca.eu, France.
Mme Ilham LOUBANE, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Samba Gorgui MANE, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Omar MARIGO, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Mamadou MBAYE, Institut de Technologie Nucléaire, Université Cheikh Anta DIOP, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Diène NDIAYE, Université Gaston Berger, Saint-Louis, Senegal.
M. Mamadou NDIAYE, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, Laboratoire J.L. Lagrange, France.
M. Mahamadou NDIAYE, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
Mme Marame NGOM, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Cheikh Ahmadou Bamba NIANG, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Kawar RIAD, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Senegal.
M. Lat Tabara SOW, Université Alioune DIOP de Bambey (UADB), Bambey, Senegal.
M. Abdoulaye SOW, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Dakar, Senegal.
M. Mansour SYLLA, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Dakar, Senegal.
Mme Aïssata THIAM, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Sénégal, et Institut National Félix Houphouët-Boigny, Yamoussoukro, Côte d’Ivoire.
M. Labaly TOURE, Association Sénégalaise pour la Promotion de l’Astronomie, Université Gaston Berger, GEOMATICA. Senegal.

Movie of the stellar occultation


[1] Buie et al. (2020), Size and Shape Constraints of (486958) Arrokoth from Stellar Occultations, 159(4), doi : 10.3847/1538-3881/ab6ced

List of press articles and interviews

October, 19th, 2020
Au Sénégal, le prélude d’une mission de la NASA. Le temps.

October 13th 2020
Pourquoi se connecter au ciel africain? Autour de la question. RFI.

Octobre 12th, 2020
Mission “Polymele” au Sénégal. Afriscitech

October 9th, 2020
Observation d’une occultation stellaire par l’astéroïde Polymèle depuis le Sénégal. Université de Toulouse.

October 5th, 2020
Le Sénégal observe pour la NASA un astéroïde qui sera visité par une sonde spatiale. Netcom.sn

October, 3rd, 2020
Astronomie : le Sénégal au cœur de la future mission spatiale Lucy de la Nasa. Espacedev.sn
La NASA a scruté une occultation stellaire depuis le centre du Sénégal. TerrangaNew.

October, 2nd, 2020
Importante mission de la NASA depuis le Sénégal. Igfm.
La NASA prépare sa future mission spatiale LUCY depuis le Sénégal. PressAfrik.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaire depuis le centre du Sénégal. Seneweb.
La NASA prépare sa future mission spatiale Lucy depuis le Sénégal. Intelligences.Info.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaire depuis le centre du Sénégal. Ndarinfo.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaire depuis le centre du Sénégal. Sen360.
Enquête+ ASPA – NASA
Mission d’observation exceptionnelle de Polymèle au Sénégal. Dakar Echo.
La NASA Prépare Sa Future Mission Spatiale LUCY Depuis Le Sénégal. Actualités Sénégal.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaiire depuis le Centre du Sénégal. Agence de Presse Sénégalaise.
Observation d’une occultation stellaire par l’astéroïde POLYMÈLE : La NASA prépare sa future mission spatiale LUCY depuis le Sénégal. Média 27.
Une mission de la NASA depuis le Sénégal. https://thieydakar.net/.
La NASA prépare sa future mission spatiale LUCY depuis le Sénégal. Actu221.net.
Astronomie: Une mission spatiale de la NASA confiée aux astronomes Sénégalais. Actu221. Interview Maram KAIRE.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaire depuis le centre du Sénégal. dakarxibar.
La NASA a observé une occultation stellaire depuis le Centre du Sénégal. FAAPA.
Le Sénégal observe pour la NASA un astéroïde qui sera visité par une sonde spatiale. Ciel et Espace.
Maram Kaïré revient sur la mission de la NASA au Sénégal : «C’est un défi lancé à notre expertise» Actu 221 (interview de Maram Kaïre, Président ASPA, coordinateur de la mission NASA au Sénégal).
NASA in Senegal – Rewmi.
Astronomie : Observation d’une occultation stellaire depuis le Sénégal de la NASA. Notre Continent.

October, 1st, 2020
Polymèle : Un astéroïde vu depuis le Sénégal. TerraSénégal.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s